Our Data

 

Mechanics of fairness

Governance alternatives

Debating rights & responsibilities

Our Data

Initiatives for public good and social justice

The track discusses both the ‘what’ and the ‘how’ of new data initiatives and infrastructures that move beyond the individual level to think collectively for the social good. Potential aims include fostering public good and social justice, supporting and accelerating social movements, and reinventing or bypassing dominant business models and logics of the data economy (such as requiring consent to surveillance, opt-in/opt-out models, and assuming one model fits everyone).

We also seek lessons learned from data commons: the production, sharing, gathering and reclaiming of data by specific communities. Examples can come from any sector, including energy consumption, health, urban development, or finance.

In addition to learning about specific initiatives, the goal is to discuss how data infrastructures and data commons work more broadly. Motivating questions include: How do emerging data initiatives and infrastructures promote innovation, social justice, citizen participation and digital dignity? What makes a particular model possible?

A pre-conference workshop on Speculative Data Futures is organized in connection with this track.

Keywords: public good, social justice, social impact, data justice, digital dignity, data commons, data infrastructure


Mechanics of fairness

Wednesday: Klubisali

10:45 - 12:00

TIME

Jussi Leppälä, Afef Abrougui, Walter Palmetshofer, Tuukka Lehtiniemi

HOST AND PRESENTERS

This session explores issues around accountability, transparency and fairness around our data. By looking at both trends and norms in respecting rights, we will explore the questions around our data and the potentials for it, with respect to redefining how accountability functions and how algorithms are used.

Session is moderated by: Tuukka Lehtiniemi

<b>Algorithmic fairness meets the GDPR</b>

Jussi Leppälä, Valmet Corporation

Algorithms make increasingly more significant decisions affecting our lives, and yet algorithmic decisions can sometimes be unfair or discriminatory. Why is algorithmic fairness so important now? Are human decisions actually more biased than algorithmic ones? Is there a commonly accepted definition for algorithmic fairness? Can an algorithm’s neutrality be proven? How can algorithmic fairness be tested?  What rights do we have related to algorithmic fairness, human intervention, and algorithmic transparency?

<b>Corporate Accountability and Our Data: Trends and Recommendations</b>

Afef Abrougui, Ranking Digital Rights

The RDR 2018 Index results indicate that users remain largely in the dark about how their information is handled by a company, and have insufficient options to control what is collected and to obtain all the information a company holds on them. This talk will highlight trends in company disclosure and present concrete steps that companies and governments can take to better ensure users’ privacy rights are being respected when companies collect, use, and share our data.

<b>OpenSCHUFA: ourdata & more transparency towards credit-scoring</b>

Walter Palmetshofer

Why we started OpenSCHUFA and why you should care about credit scoring:

Germany’s leading credit rating bureau, SCHUFA, has immense power over people’s lives. A low SCHUFA score means landlords will refuse to rent you an apartment, banks will reject your credit card application and network providers will say ‘computer says no’ to a new Internet contract. But what if your SCHUFA score is low because there are mistakes in your credit history? Or if the score is calculated by a mathematical model that is biased?

The big problem is, we simply don’t know how accurate SCHUFA’s or any other credit scoring data is and how it computes its scores. OpenSCHUFA wants to change this by analyzing thousands of credit records.

This is not just happening in Germany, or just with credit scoring, for example the Chinese government has decided to introduce a scoring system by 2020 that assigns a „social value“ to all residents.

We will present the results from the first 6 month of the campaign, if we reached the goal to reconstruct or approximate the Schufa-Score by crowdsourcing the data.

Start:                                .. (allow 2 min for settling in)

Opening:                        .. (5 minutes, moderator)                 

Intro of presenter 1:                .. (3 minutes, moderator)

Presenter 1:                        .. (13 minutes)


Q&A for presenter 1:                .. (5 minutes)

Intro of presenter 2:                .. (3 minutes)

Presenter 2:                        .. (13 minutes)

Q&A for presenter 2:        .. (5 minutes)

Intro of presenter 3:                .. (3 minutes)

Presenter 3:                        .. (13 minutes)

Q&A for presenter 3:        .. (5 minutes)

Closing:                        .. (5 minutes, moderator)

End:        


Governance alternatives

Wednesday: Klubisali

13:15 - 14:30

TIME

Sean McDonald, Bruno Carballa Smichowski, Markus Niessen, Shazade Jameson

HOST AND PRESENTERS

This session discusses overarching dynamics of data governance, in order to address power asymmetries through structural approaches to our data. By bringing together both conceptual and practical approaches, we will explore models and potential sources of leverage for empowerment. You hear talks from Sean McDonald, Bruno Carballa Smichowski and Markus Niessen.

Session is moderated by: Shazade Jameson

<b>Trust & Trusts: The Mechanics of Data Governance</b>

Sean McDonald, Digital Public

In this presentation, we'll look at the three major sources of leverage in data ecosystems (access, sovereignty, and ownership) - and what each approach tells us about how to build data governance. Then, we'll look at the mechanisms each system favors, and what that means for public interest data governance - and make a practical recommendation about ways forward.

<b>An analysis of non-exclusivist models of data governance</b>

Bruno Carballa Smichowski, Chronos / CEPN-Université Paris XIII

This presentation will distinguish four families of alternative data governance models and analyze the governance and business models characteristic of each of them. We will show that no one-size-fits all solution is either viable or suitable and that, on the contrary, the most appropriate data governance model depends on several intertwined features such as the type of data involved (personal/non personal, use values of the data, etc.), technical requirements to produce and maintain the databases or the market structures involved.

<b>Data to the People - MIDATA Cooperatives</b>

Markus Niessen

People have a right to a copy of all their personal data (GDPR, Data Portability).  Since only they have the maximal aggregation power over their personal data citizens become important actors in a new personal data ecosystem. MIDATA offers a functional and secure data platform for people to store and manage access to their personal data. Governed as  non-profit data cooperatives users do not only obtain data sovereignty, as members of the cooperatives they can also participate in the democratic governance of the cooperative and decide how revenues will be invested into project that benefit society at large. Several health related projects are currently running on the Swiss MIDATA platform. Furthermore we are helping our partners in Germany, The Netherlands, Belgium and UK to establish MIDATA cooperatives according to the same governance principles. Given that the need of patients and citizens are similar in different countries, studies established in one countries can easily be replicated on a MIDATA platform in another country. Thus the MIDATA cooperative model empowers citizens as actors in the digital society and contributes to the democratization of the personal data economy.

Start:                                .. (allow 2 min for settling in)

Opening:                        .. (5 minutes, moderator)                 

Intro of presenter 1:                .. (3 minutes, moderator)

Presenter 1:                        .. (13 minutes)


Q&A for presenter 1:                .. (5 minutes)

Intro of presenter 2:                .. (3 minutes)

Presenter 2:                        .. (13 minutes)

Q&A for presenter 2:        .. (5 minutes)

Intro of presenter 3:                .. (3 minutes)

Presenter 3:                        .. (13 minutes)

Q&A for presenter 3:        .. (5 minutes)

Closing:                        .. (5 minutes, moderator)

End:                                ..


Debating rights & responsibilities

Wednesday: Klubisali

15:00 - 16:15

TIME

Laura James, Christopher Olk, Heidi Laine, Linnet Taylor

HOST AND PRESENTERS

The aim of this session is to think how the move beyond the individual aids in the pooling of data resources for the public good. The issues discussed range from a need to build a collective history, to using technologies in a responsible manner and to data redefined as general intellect. You hear talks from Laura James, Christopher Olk, and Heidi Laine.

Session is moderated by: Linnet Taylor

<b>Making responsible technology the new normal</b>

Laura James, Doteveryone

More than ever, we are aware of the need for better practices to address key challenges and tensions between technology and society. How can we make this a practical reality? We’ll outline the research from Doteveryone, including prototyping tools with businesses in the UK, and discuss how a movement towards responsible tech can bring together and amplify work on privacy, rights online, and more.

<b>Determining Datamining: A Marxist perspective</b>

Christopher Olk, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society

Taking some thoughts on “data as labour” stemming from postoperationism one step further, I will argue that data should best be understood as something Karl Marx has called the "General Intellect" of a society: What is usually just social and linguistic cooperation and play is appropriated and turned into capital (both fixed and circulant) by platforms. While this perspective may be attractive for left-leaning data activists, it also implies that data is less the product of an individual than of an entire society: OurData instead of MyData.

<b>Right to be remembered</b>

Heidi Laine, University of Helsinki

Understanding and being aware of history in all its aspects, from the elite to the oppressed, from the public sphere to the private, is crucial to societal development. Will tomorrows history be written only from the point of view of the victor, the strong and the prevailing? In this session we will discuss GDPR and data privacy from the point of view of remembering vs. forgetting.

Start:                                .. (allow 2 min for settling in)

Opening:                        .. (5 minutes, moderator)                 

Intro of presenter 1:                .. (3 minutes, moderator)

Presenter 1:                        .. (13 minutes)


Q&A for presenter 1:                .. (5 minutes)

Intro of presenter 2:                .. (3 minutes)

Presenter 2:                        .. (13 minutes)

Q&A for presenter 2:        .. (5 minutes)

Intro of presenter 3:                .. (3 minutes)

Presenter 3:                        .. (13 minutes)

Q&A for presenter 3:        .. (5 minutes)

Closing:                        .. (5 minutes, moderator)

End:        

Short URL to this document: http://okf.fi/mydata2018-ourdata 

Slack channel: https://mydataglobal.slack.com/messages/C8SRFN6MC 

Email alias: ourdata@mydata.org 

Title: 02. Our Data

Subtitle: Initiatives for public good and social justice

Description: 

The track discusses both the ‘what’ and the ‘how’ of new data initiatives and infrastructures that move beyond the individual level to think collectively for the social good. Potential aims include reinventing or bypassing dominant business models of the data economy (such as demanding consent to surveillance, opt-in/opt-out models, and assuming one model fits everyone), fostering the public good and social justice, and supporting and accelerating social movements. We also seek lessons learned  from functioning data commons: the production, sharing, gathering and reclaiming of data by specific communities. Examples can come from any sector, including energy consumption, health, urban development, or finance. In addition to learning about specific initiatives, the goal is to discuss how data infrastructures and data commons work more broadly. Motivating questions include: How do emerging data initiatives and infrastructures promote innovation, social justice, citizen participation and digital dignity? What makes a particular model possible?

List of keywords: public good, social justice, data justice, digital dignity, data commons, data infrastructures  

Links to external resources:

Track telco 11th May 2018

John (temp. facilitator), Tuukka Lehtiniemi (host), Shaz, Gianfranco

  • Looking at Trello. Two maybes reviewed:
  • Christopher Olk - to accept. John will send accepted email (Viivi’s email template and cc’d).
  • Jussi Leppälä - to accept. John will send accepted email (Viivi’s email template and cc’d). But need to tie in to session focus make links more explicit
  • Proposals into sessions. Arrange trello cards with Days/visuals. Not 100% clear the difference between double session (with lunch break) vs. two separate sessions either side of official lunch break.
  • Update session titles and description texts (above). Next draft done.
  • Ask for feedback from other track hosts - email from Tuukka.
  • Next telco to be decided.

Track telco 25 Jan 2018

Viivi Lähteenoja (facilitator), Tuukka Lehtiniemi (host), Minna Ruckenstein (host)

  • Other two track hosts Linnet Taylor, Shazade Jameson
  • Confirmed presenters:
  • Mad Price Ball → from the US
  • Dawn Nafus (Intel) → from the US
  • Salvatore Iaconesi + 1 → from Italy
  • Pre-conf workshop with Iaconesi: work together with Daniel Kaplan / future track?
  • How to involve academics other than to give academic papers?
  • Should we include ethics?
  • Ask for better wifi in Klubisali → Viivi will pass on request to Sille that sessions would be there
  • Next steps:
  • Tuukka will get in touch with Daniel re: Salvatore Iaconesi
  • Tuukka & Minna will write  a 2.0 version of the previous call text by Jan 1st
  • Viivi will invite Linnet Taylor & Shazade Jameson to Slack and the #ourdata channel

Inaugural track telco 19 Jan 2018

Tuukka Lehtiniemi, Viivi Lähteenoja (facilitator)

Catching up:

  • Update on what’s been going on so far
  • Several invitations for presenters sent out
  • Confirmed: Madeleine Price Ball / Open Humans
  • Likely (?): Dawn Nafus (Intel)
  • Pre-conf workshop “Speculative data futures”, Tuesday, max 10-20 persons, full-day, venue? → deliverable to be presented at the conf (exhibit of some sort)

Next steps:

  • Confirm third track host (non-Finnish)
  • By Friday Feb 1st at 2PM (CET) all tracks should have:
  • Title of the track (ideally not more than 4 words) → Our Data
  • Subtitle (up to 8 words to add descriptive power to the title) → ??
  • One paragraph description (approx. 150 words / 700 characters) → ??
  • “Slug”: word that will be used in email alias and url:s (i.e. gdpr@mydata.org) → ourdata
  • http://mydata.org/alias fill in the form to have an email alias collectively to reach all track hosts from the same address (trackname@mydata.org). Also individual programme team members may have alias (name@mydata.org) →
  • Optional
  • Links to key external web resources relevant to the topic (0-4 links)